Bio (version 1)

Vermont born, fifth generation fiddle player, Patrick Ross won the Vermont-State Fiddle Championship at age fourteen. He has performed at the Grand Ole Opry and shared stages with Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash and Paul McCartney. In 2012, he was invited to perform at both the Calvin Coolidge Theater in The Library of Congress and The Kennedy Center for Performing Arts. He has had the pleasure of working with Christopher Lloyd in a recent production of, “Call Of The Wild 3D” and assisted in the scoring of the film. He now lives in Newbury, Vermont with his wife and daughter. He works and teaches in collaboration with the Vermont Folklife Center and has recently started an independent record label called Rock Farmer Records with the mission of producing, recording and preserving Roots music. His solo concerts include a world wide range of fiddle styles as well as songs he has penned with guitar, banjo, mandolin and cello. For full length videos and other musings please visit www.patrickrossmusic.com

Bio ( version 2 )

The story begins in the borderlands of Quebec in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom where Patrick Ross learned traditional folk tunes from his father and began his journey as a fifth generation fiddle player. Outlaw Country, Blues, Gospel, Folk, Gypsy Jazz, Classical and Bluegrass are all stops along the way though this autobiographical account of the artist’s formative moments in music. Life lessons, laughs and the associated sounds of people and places that have enriched Ross’s catalog are the topic of this multi-instrument, multi-genre acoustic concert.

With every name there’s a face, a place and an accent. There is, more importantly, a way of doing things that is at the heart of identity, whether personal, cultural or musical. From backyard BBQ’s to stadium concerts, each experience along the way has expanded Patrick’s musical vocabulary to match any occasion and to better express himself.

Having crossed many borders in the United States, Canada, Central America and Europe, a show is Patrick Ross’s statement on identity through ways of, “doing music”.

What Mountain Money is

By Patrick Ross & Jeremy Wheeler –
Mountain Money is a currency. It isn’t traded in the financial markets of the port cities, and doesn’t have much value down in the railroad towns or river towns. You can’t deposit it in any bank, and you can’t use it to buy a train or bus ticket to escape from an urban center to a mountain retreat.
But to those carving out a living in hills and hollows of greater Appalachia, the value of Mountain Money is clear. Out in the woods for a long day of logging, sugaring, or hunting, the one who remembered to bring toilet paper has Mountain Money. During mud season, the guy carrying a chain in the back of his four-wheel drive pickup has Mountain Money. On a hot summer’s day, the one who knows the way to a secret swimming hole has Mountain Money.

Truth be told, there are many who try to escape the hustle-and-bustle of the city life to live out their fantasies of a rural life. The ones that don’t make it past more than a few mud seasons are the ones who never learn how to trade in Mountain Money. The old-timers who know how to get things done in this-here-particular-neck-of-the-woods may not have much in the way of financial security, but are rich in Mountain Money. They’re the ones who tell the stories of the “flatlanders” who never quite figure it out. Those stories are currency. Those stories are Mountain Money.

The Mountain Money Concert Series is a celebration of these values. The melodies, chord progressions, and song structures are a currency long traded in logging and hunting camps, and in parlors and on porches of homes in mining and mill towns. Because hauling a piano up into the mountains makes about as much sense as building Fitzcaraldo’s opera house in the Amazon jungle, the fiddle and banjo are the instruments of choice for this celebration of Mountain Money. Both instruments are easily carried, project with equal loudness, and are complementary to one another—the banjo’s staccato pulse with the fiddle’s legato melody—and thus have a long tradition of being played in the places where Mountain Money is the only available currency.
We welcome you to our celebration of value that can’t be quantified, and invite you to join in: stomp your feet, clap your hands, and get up and dance if you feel like it. Or just sit back and enjoy the show. Just remember to take a little with you when you go, because Mountain Money is creative energy that grows in value as it is shared in community.

“It’s not just the technical expertise or the mastery of an amazing variety of styles that puts Vermont fiddler Patrick Ross several steps above and beyond practically all other players; Ross’s eclectic taste and raw energy make sparks and create musical magic every time his bow hits the strings.”- Robert Resnik – VPR –

“Accomplished, innovative, imaginative, and supremely musical, Ross captured the adrenalin of a thousand hearts.  As the last note spiraled into the stratosphere and evaporated, the crowd sprang to its feet and roared for more.”  – Stephen Pedersen The Halifax Gazette –

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